Friday, December 20, 2013

Dear A.P. Literature Students...

December 20, 2013


Dear A.P. Lit scholars,

It was wonderful to see so many of you yesterday.  Please know that I have been thinking constantly about you; although I've been worrying about how you're doing, I also know how incredibly strong you are.  I was so proud of you for bravely walking back into our building on Thursday and reclaiming it. As someone who has been back in the school for the past three days, I can tell you that each time I reenter the school, it does get a little easier. Seeing all of your faces helps.

Some of you have been asking about the final exam that we were going to take last Tuesday.  After talking at length with with Mr. Kleeman and Mr. Miles, here is what we have decided:

We will offer, in lieu of a final exam, an optional full length practice A.P. Literature exam from 2:30-5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 16 in rooms C-12, C-13 and C-16. We strongly recommend that our junior students and our seniors who have not taken A.P. Language take this practice exam. All A.P. Literature students, however, are welcome.

In terms of first semester grades, I will complete the grading of poetry papers and enter these over the break.  I will also enter the poetry project grades and any revisions that have been submitted to me in the past few weeks. If you have any concerns about your grade, please e-mail me.

I wish all of you restful, peaceful breaks.  Keep taking care of one another.

Much love,
Ms. Leclaire

Friday, December 13, 2013

December 13, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: What do we want to know about the AP Literature exam?

1. Warm-up: Charlie's poetry project

2. Engaging in a little Q&A about the AP exam
  • In section one, how many multiple choice questions are there?
  • How much time do we have to answer them?
  • How many passages can we expect to read in the multiple choice section?
  • Are the passages mostly poems or mostly prose?
  • Are the passages mostly modern or mostly traditional?
  • Should we try to answer every single question?
  • What percentage of our AP score is the multiple choice section worth?
  • About how much money is spent on creating the average multiple choice question?
  • How many essays do we write in the second section of the test?
  • How much time do we have to write these essays?
  • Do I have to write the essays in order?
  • For the open prompt, do I have to pick a book from the list?
  • Who grades the AP tests?


3. Offering you some thoughts about A.P. Language essays vs. A.P. Literature essays

4. Taking a look at the essays (called "free responses") from the past three years and discussing strategies

Order?
Timing?
Structure?


HW:
Finish reading and annotating Invisible Man for Monday; bring your laptop to class if you have one.  Also, I strongly suggest rereading the Prologue once you've finished the book.

Thursday, December 12, 2013

December 12, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: What larger patterns are Ellison's images starting to form?

1. Warm-up: A little sketching as we listen to Chapter 21

2. Socratic seminar: Discussing Chapters 18-22 of Invisible Man

3. Last 10 minutes: Wrapping up the discussion and trading bookmarks

HW:
1. Bring your review book to class tomorrow.

2. Finish reading and annotating Invisible Man for Monday's discussion; create your last "Big Question" blog entry of the semester for Invisible Man.

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

December 11, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: How can we access poetry through our own creative processes?

1. Warm-up: Enjoying snack day

2. Finishing our last (but certainly not least) poetry presentations

3. Reflecting on the projects; please click HERE.

4. Distributing A.P. review books and starting to review for the midterm

HW:
Read through Chapter 22 for tomorrow's Socratic seminar on Invisible Man; prepare for the discussion by annotating well and by adding to your bookmarks, which you will trade in tomorrow.

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

December 10, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?


Focus: How can we understand poetry through our own creative processes?

1. Warm-up: Taking a moment to celebrate Alex Baughman




What Alex has to say about Henry IV:
"Henry IV speaks of honor, truth, and nobility, but it also reveals the dark conquest man takes to achieve these qualities. Through Shakespeare’s retelling of historic events in Henry IV, the battle between good and evil arises once again as man strives to be pure."

What Alex has to say about Wuthering Heights:
"The constant revenge and darkness of Wuthering Heights would lead to the conclusion that humankind is naturally evil; however, even in the darkest moments there is a hint of goodness."

What Alex has to say about Oedipus Rex:
"We try to cover up our animalistic qualities through our actions, but in the end we still commit terrible crimes."

What Mrs. Lee has to say about Alex:
Alex is "kind, polite, respectful, [with] a good sense of humor. He doesn't take himself too seriously and accepts criticism graciously."

What Mr. Smith has to say about Alex:
"Alex is, without a doubt, one of the top one or two juniors in our AP Physics class!"

(And, yes, there are only 2 juniors in our class.  That's what makes it funny.)

(But Alex is actually a great kid and does a great job in this tough class!)

What Mrs. Bretz has to say about Alex:
"A modest student who never wants to let people know how smart he really is!"

From Mrs. Bradley:
"Alex,
Thank you for taking Health with me. I enjoy having you in class. To you and everyone in AP Literature, make smart choices. Balance your PMS.... Not that... Your Physical, Mental and Social health. Take care of your mind, body and soul. Find your happy. :)"

What Alex's mom and dad have to say about Alex:
“Alex is an unassuming gem.  On the surface he's your typical teenager plugged into one or multiple devices and wearing summer clothes in winter(!) but underneath he has a maturity and strength of character beyond his years.  No transformation into a horrendous teenager, just the opposite.  Alex's endearing personality and funny sense of humor get better with age."

~ Tom and Debbie Baughman

Also, they included this picture:


2. Enjoying each other's poetry presentations

HW:
1. Read through Chapter 22 of Invisible Man by Thursday; prepare for Socratic by annotating and adding to your bookmark.

2. Watch "The Sing-Off."

Monday, December 9, 2013

December 9, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: How can we understand poetry through our own creations?

1. Turning in your poetry essays and reflecting on what went well and what didn't

2. Establishing the presentation order for the next three days

3. Enjoying poetry presentations!

HW:
1. Read and annotate Chapters 19, 20, 21 and 22 for Thursday's Socratic seminar. Keep filling in your bookmark and bring it to class on Thursday to trade.

2. Please come see me this week if you have any concerns about your grade, or if you'd like to go over any of your writings with me.

Friday, December 6, 2013

December 6, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: What patterns of movement are you noticing in Invisible Man?

1. Warm-up: Thinking about symbols and movement (or lack thereof?) in Invisible Man

Step 1: Make a list of intriguing objects and minor characters you've encountered in the novel so far

Step 2: This is the creative part...try to spacially organize these objects in a way that reflect movement in the novel.  Is the narrator moving in a circle? In a downward spiral? Up a hill?  In a boomerang? Something totally different?  Where should the different objects lie on this pattern of motion and why?

2. Socratic seminar or small groups--your choice: Chapters 18 and 19 of Invisible Man

HW: 
1. Poetry projects and papers due Monday.  Yep.

Thursday, December 5, 2013

December 5, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: What help do you need from me?

1. Warm-up: Finishing up yesterday's MC discussion

2. Working on projects and papers

PROJECT PEOPLE: Please print a hard copy of your poem for me today.  I will make a packet of all of your poems for the class.  Include your name and the poet's name on your printout.

Also, remember that your project does need to include a polished, dramatic reading of your poem.

PAPER PEOPLE: Please include an MLA heading on your paper and page numbers. Staple your poem to the back of your essay. 

There should be a thesis somewhere in your essay, but it doesn't need to be at the end of the first paragraph.

In the explication/analysis portion of your essay, please organize your paragraphs by argument; then, use poetic devices (allusion, metaphor, imagery, alliteration, repetition, slant rhyme, etc.) to support your arguments.

HW:
1. Prepare for tomorrow's fishbowl discussion of Invisible Man, Chapters 17 and 18.

2. Continue working on your project or paper (due Monday).

Tuesday, December 3, 2013

December 4, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: How can we apply our brilliance to the daunting multiple choice questions on the AP test?

1. Warm-up: Discussing how to read a prose passage for an AP Literature multiple choice section

What Ms. Leclaire does:

I pretend that I'm sitting on my couch at home, sipping coffee from my Keurig and reading this passage for pleasure.  I ignore the multiple choice questions until I'm done reading the passage.

a. I read the first inch and the last inch very carefully as I attempt to decipher the tone.  If there is hyperbole (exaggeration) or understatement, or if it just kind of sounds Victorian, I strongly suspect irony.

b. I try to figure out what makes the characters complex.  If the characters are overly simplified and not particularly believable as humans, once again, I suspect irony. I also examine the characters' relationships with each other.

c. I take a good look at the setting and how it connects to the characters.

d. I seek tension and resolution (or lack of resolution). In other words, what central problem is established, and what happens with that problem?


2. Reading Prose Passage #3 (1987) together and discussing the first inch, the last inch, the characters, the setting, the tension, and the resolution

3. Finding the "key" to each question

4. Talking through the answers to questions 1-15

HW:
1. Bring your paper/project/Invisible Man to class tomorrow for work time and conferences.

2. Read Chapters 18 and 19 for Friday's Socratic.

3. Papers and projects are due Monday.

Monday, December 2, 2013

December 3, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: What are our expectations for the poetry papers and projects?

1. Part 1: Viewing three poetry projects

Think about the poetry project like this: Find the strongest connection between the best parts of the poem and the best parts of you.

As you watch, think about this: What aspects of the poems do you think the project creators connected to?

Please note that each project was either introduced or followed with an in-depth analysis of the poem and the choices made during the creation of the project.

2. Part 2: Reading through two poetry papers

Note: The format of this essay differs from the traditional five-paragraph essay.  Please pay careful attention to the directions on the poetry overview, and keep in mind that the analysis of the poem should dictate several body paragraphs, not just one.

3. Taking time for individuals in desperate need of conferences!

IF YOU HAVE NOT DONE SO YET, PLEASE COPY YOUR POEM INTO YOUR METACOGNITIVE AND INDICATE WHETHER YOU ARE CREATING A PROJECT OR PAPER.

HW:
1. Continue working on your poetry paper/project (due Monday).

2. Read and carefully annotate the next two chapters of Invisible Man for Friday's Socratic.

3. Bring Friday's multiple choice practice to class tomorrow.

Sunday, December 1, 2013

December 2, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: What is (d)evolving in Invisible Man, and what remains unchanged?

1. Warm-up: Exploring the evolving (or devolving?) patterns in Chapters 1-16 of Invisible Man


Find the single most important line in your assigned chapter and read it aloud.

As you listen, consider what these lines have in common.  In other words, what patterns do they establish?

Draw conclusions by considering these questions:
What's evolving?  What only seems like it's evolving?
What's devolving?
What's staying the same, and why is this important?

2. Socratic seminar: Chapters 15 and 16 of Invisible Man

3. Wrapping up discussion and exchanging bookmarks

HW:
1. Go back to your metacognitive writing and paste your poem directly into it.  Also, at the top of your writing, please indicate whether you are completing a project or a poem.

2. Bring your paper/project materials to class tomorrow, which will largely be a work day and conference day.

3. Read Chapters 17 and 18 of Invisible Man for Friday's Socratic; remember that your bookmark and your annotations are your reading ticket.

Thursday, November 21, 2013

/November 21, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Dear students,

There aren't many things that could take me away from you.  Having a baby is one of them.  Watching that baby almost die is another.  The past two days have been terrifying, but Henry is hanging in there.  We will be at Children's Hospital for at least few more days.  I will keep you posted.

In the meantime, please keep working hard and being respectful of the substitute and of each other.  E-mail me if you need help or have questions.

Much love,
Ms. Leclaire

1. Warm-up: Perusing each other's bookmarks, musical chairs style (you may need to explain to the substitute teacher what this is).  Take your composition notebook with you as you and write your reactions and comments to each other's bookmarks in your composition notebooks. Do this for a couple rounds, then TRADE BOOKMARKS WITH EACH OTHER.

If the substitute has other plans for you for the first part of class, that's fine, too.  Just be sure to trade bookmarks before you leave class today.

2. Socratic seminar: Please make sure you have a scribe today.

HW:
1. Continue following the Invisible Man reading schedule, annotating and adding to your new bookmark as you go.

2. Continue working on your poetry project/paper.  Please e-mail me with question, and I will give you feedback on your metacognitive writing over the break.

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

November 20, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: Is your poem worthy?

1. Warm-up: Perusing a sample metacognitive: "Darkness"

2. Testing your poem with a little (or a lot of) metacognition

3. Final 10 minutes: Recapping the purpose and structure of the poetry paper/project and answering questions

HW:
1. Finish your metacognitive if you did not finish in class; Google share it with kleclaire@lps.k12.co.us (Title it like this: "Michael Carlson's Metacognitive: How Cuteness Makes You Likeable")

2. Prepare for tomorrow's Socratic seminar on Invisible Man, Chapters 11 and 12 (as well as any previous chapters you'd like to discuss as a class).  For your reading ticket, add to your bookmark and annotate your text with questions, connections, and analysis.

Monday, November 18, 2013

November 19, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Lit?

Focus: How do the opening chapters of Invisible Man establish everything you need to know about the rest of the book?

1. Warm-up: Exploring the pieces of the puzzle Ellison hands to you in the Prologue and Chapter 1


  • The title of your motif (ex: The battle royal)
  • The best quotation describing your motif (and page number)
  • A few notes on what we know about this motif based on Ellison's first description of it?
  • As you read, please add to the bookmark by doing the following:
  • Write down the page numbers where this motif resurfaces, usually in a slightly different form.
  • Explain how each new version of your motif deepens/alters your understanding of it.  Feel free to ask questions, too.


These, along with your annotations, will be your reading tickets for the time being.  With each reading assignment, we'll trade bookmarks with each other.

Here are the prominent motifs I'm seeing in the Prologue and Chapter 1 so far, but feel free to add to the list:

Monopolated Light & Power (5)
Grandpa's deathbed advice/curse (16)
The battle royal (21-26)
Black men and sensuous white women/the "Brute" (19-20)
Tatlock (24-25)
The Sambo (26)
The electrified rug of coins (27-29)
The brief case (32)
The brass tokens masquerading as gold coins (32)
"Keep This Nigger-Boy Running" (33)
The color white
Blood
Eyes and "I's"
Veils and blindfolds

2. Socratic Seminar: The Prologue and Chapter 1 of Invisible Man (and connections to subsequent chapters)

3. Going around the circle with final thoughts and questions

HW:
1. Bring your poem to class for tomorrow's metacognitive, as well as any other work you have done on your project or paper.

2. I'm switching up the end of the week just a bit because of absences; on Thursday we will have our next Socratic (Chapters 11 and 12), and on Friday we will have small group discussions (Chapters 13 and 14).  Reading tickets = bookmarks

Saturday, November 16, 2013

November 18, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: What have you been up these past two months?

1. Warm-up: Sharing the past two months of my life with you

2. Sharing the past two months of your life with me via letter writing

3. Sending around an optional conference sign-up and going over the upcoming weeks

4. Small groups: Teaching Ms. Leclaire what you've learned first semester about...

Wuthering Heights
Henry IV, Part I
Invisible Man
Tuesday Writings
How to read a poem

HW: 
Follow the Invisible Man reading schedule; please reread the Prologue and Chapter 1 for tomorrow.

Tuesday, Nov 19: Socratic on the Prologue and Chapter 1 and how these two chapters have echoed through subsequent chapters so far.

Wednesay, Nov 20:  BRING YOUR PROJECT/PAPER POEM TO CLASS WEDNESDAY FOR A METACOGNITIVE WRITING. You may also wish to bring your own laptop if you have one.

Thursday, Nov 21: Bring your "bookmarks" for small group discussion on Chapters 11 and 12.

Friday, Nov 22: Socratic on Chapters 13 and 14 (as well as anything from earlier chapters you'd like to discuss as a class).


Thanksgiving Break

Monday, December 2: Socratic on Chapters 15 and 16

Friday, December 6: Socratic on Chapters 17 and 18; all make-up work, revisions, and grade changes are due.

Monday, December 9: Poetry papers and projects due; presentations begin

Thursday, December 12: Socratic: Chapters 19-22

Monday, December 16: Socratic: Chapter 23-end

Friday, November 15, 2013

November 15, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

1. Finish the time lines and post your group's thematic statements.
2. Read the Time magazine article.
3. Discuss the article and make connections to Invisible Man

HW--Read Chapters 11-14. Mrs. Leclaire will give you exact due-dates and tickets!

It was a pleasure being your teacher. Good luck with all of your studies and enjoy the remaining months of school. You are wonderful!

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

November 13, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. English?

1. Go into small groups and share your Literary 3 x 3's. Select a good one for each chapter and post them on today's class blog (under 3 x 3's)
2. Ask and discuss your questions.
3. Polarities Assignment is here and here.


Tuesday, November 12, 2013

November 13, 2013: What's Happening In A.P. Literature?

Read and discuss the grading rubric for "Evening Hawk."

Workshop yesterday's essay.

HW--Read and annotate Chapters 6-10 of Invisible Man and complete the ticket.

Monday, November 11, 2013

November 12, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Let's discuss yesterday's poem ("Tornados") and the thesis statements. What questions/observations do you have about the poetry drill, the poem, the prompt, the thesis statements?

You may use the poetry drill to help you move through today's poem if you believe that will be helpful to you. Spend about 10 minutes of the allotted time reading and annotating the poem and planning your essay.

HW--Read and annotate Chapters 6-10, Invisible Man. Complete the ticket assignment (last Friday's blog) Due Thursday.



Sunday, November 10, 2013

November 11, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

1. Overview of the Week:
  • M--Poetry drill--How to Read a Poem
  • T--Tuesday writing--a modern poem by William Carlos Williams
  • W--Late-start day, shortened period. Workshop Tuesday's essay.
  • Th--Discuss Chapters 6-10 of Invisible Man.
  • Friday--Discussion--Invisible Man and Time magazine article.

Go into small groups (no larger than 4, please). Using the poetry drill I've handed you, break down the poem, "Tornadoes." At the end of class, you'll be asked to write and share a thesis and topic sentences for an A.P. style question about the poem. This exercise will give you a useful strategy for unlocking the meaning of any poem you encounter on an A.P. exam!

HW--Invisible Man, Chapters 6-10 due Thursday. (Ticket is described on Friday's class blog.)

Thursday, November 7, 2013

November 8, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Break into two groups today to prepare for the poetry assignment.

Poetry Project Group--You'll need a computer!
  • Share with the group what you would like to create for your poem and then complete a project proposal (see the link on Mrs. Leclaire's class web page.) Hand in the proposal on Monday.
  • Sub-divide your group so that you are meeting with other students who are creating similar projects.
  • Create a rubric for your smaller group's project. Look on-line for rubrics. Study the half rubric that the A.P. teachers have created, and then create a second half. (Find this on Mrs. Leclaire's A.P. Lit. web page.) All members of the group must agree on the standards that you are setting for each other. Hand in your group's rubric on Monday.
Poetry Paper Group--You'll need a computer!
  • Free-write a paragraph explaining what attracted you to your poem--tell a little story, or describe your initial response to the poem. Why did you choose this poem above all others? This paragraph will become part of your introduction.
  • Read the directions for this essay if you have not done so.  What questions do you have?
  • Read sample essays and discuss them. Mrs. Leclaire posted a sample essay on her A.P. Lit. web page. (Avoid reading an essay about the poem you have chosen. Doing so will interfere with your own discoveries...)
When you finish, please read and annotate the Time magazine article. We will discuss it on Monday and make connections to Invisible Man.

HW: Read and annotate chapters 6-10 for next Thursday. Here is the ticket that's due on Thursday.

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

November 7, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: Grappling with The Invisible Man, Prologue + Chapters 1-5

Divide into small groups. Use the tickets you prepared to help you focus your discussion.
  • Share your quotations and the page numbers. Student one reads his/her quote and the others go round the circle, each reacting to/commenting on/analyzing that quote. The last person to comment is the student who read the quote.
  • Ask your questions, chapter by chapter and discuss them. Take turns. Give everyone equal time.
At the end of the period, you'll be given time to bring your most interesting topic of discussion to the rest of the class. Summarize what you discussed and what you concluded so we can all learn something from you.

Do we need another day to continue discussing these chapters?

Homework: Read Chapters 6-10 for next Thursday.

Tuesday, November 5, 2013

November 6, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Finish our discussion of "Redwings"--the poem that illustrates "Multiple Meanings."
Enjoy looking at some of the poetry projects from years gone by...
HW--Prologue+Chapters 1-5+Ticket (with questions) for tomorrow's small-group discussions.

Monday, November 4, 2013

November 5, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

M&M method of analyzing poetry (especially useful for modern and post-modern poems). We will use this method to analyze 3 poems by James Wright:

  • "Autumn begins in Martens Ferry, Ohio" (Moment)
  •  "A Blessing" (Movement)
  • "Redwings." (Multiple meanings)


Tomorrow (time permitting--if not, then Friday): Meta-cognitive writing about your poem (in class).

HW Read Invisible Man and prepare ticket for Thursday's Socratic Seminar (or would you prefer small group discussions?)


Friday, November 1, 2013

November 4, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

1. Hand in a copy of your poem.
1. Prewriting and small-group discussion of topics related to Invisible Man.
2. Easing our way into Invisible Man--Thinking out loud as we read The Prologue

  • Rude student discussion: Interrupt the reader by blurting out questions and comments. 
3. Tomorrow and maybe Wednesday--3 poems (The M&M Method of Reading Poems)

HW:
  • Read: Prologue+Chapters 1-5 of Invisible Man. Due Thursday.
  • Reading Ticket for Thursday's Socratic Seminar:
    • Find a challenging, beautiful, intriguing, or maddening passage. Quote it at the top of your paper. Then write a paragraph or two interpreting/reacting to it. What about this passage interests, confuses, or bothers you and why? 
    • One good discussion question for each chapter. (That's five questions!)

Thursday, October 31, 2013

November 1, 2013 What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

1. Help yourself to a copy of Invisible Man. We'll do some pre-reading activities on Monday and begin reading the Prologue out loud.
2. Take a computer and create a Henry IV document for today's in-class essay.

  • Read the prompt carefully. (Warning: The prompt limits you, so please notice that!) Write a profound, brilliant, and detailed essay.
  • Print the essay and hand it in at the end of the hour.
HW

  • Find a poem by Monday. Print it. Include the name of the poet.
  •  Due Thursday: Invisible Man--Prologue + Chapters 1-5. (That's 135 pages of reading!) More information about the reading ticket is forthcoming.

Have a great weekend!

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

October 31, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Happy Halloween!
1. Arrange the desks for a Socratic seminar.
2. Non-participants: Please volunteer for one of these jobs:
  • scribe (on class blog)
  • record-keeper
  • quote-keeper (Would you also serve as a time-keeper? Stop us in time to do the go-around at the end!)
HW--Write about Henry IV, Part 1 on your Big Question Blog. This is due tomorrow.
Review some of the key speeches in Henry--those by Henry, Hal, Hotspur, Falstaff. Put a few small quotes in your head that you can insert in your essay. Adding the actual language of the play will contribute to the richness of your detail.

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

October 30, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature

Hello Juniors! The seniors aren't with us today, so we'll read poems from the links on Mrs. Leclaire's web page. Take out a computer and begin searching for a poem that...
  • you've never studied before
  • you want to read again and again
  • intrigues and tantalizes you
  • befuddles and frustrates you
  • is perplexing but delightful
  • is a puzzle you want to solve
  • hits you in your solar plexus
  • hurts your head
Read a wide variety of poems--traditional, modern, post-modern. Copy and paste the poem that calls to you on a document, print it, and hand it in on Monday.

Enjoy this day!

HW--(You may work on this if after you find your poem.)
  1. Write about Henry IV, Part 1 on your Big Question Blog. This is due Friday.
  2. Prepare the ticket (see the 10/28 class blog) and 3 questions for tomorrow's Socratic seminar.

Monday, October 28, 2013

October 29, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

1. Finish Act V performances.
2. Discuss poetry assignment.
3. Sign up to do a paper or a creative project. (Half and half, please--)

HW

  1. Write about Henry IV, Part 1 on your Big Question Blog. This is due Friday.
  2. Prepare a ticket and 3 questions for Thursday's Socratic seminar.
  3. Find a  poem that...
  • you've never studied before
  • you want to read again and again
  • intrigues and tantalizes you
  • befuddles and frustrates you
  • is perplexing but delightful
  • is a puzzle you want to solve
  • hits you in your solar plexus
  • hurts your head
A printed copy of the poem is due Monday.

Friday, October 25, 2013

October 27, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

1. Finish rehearsing the battle scenes in Act V.
2. At 9:00, begin presentations.
3. If we don't finish the scenes today, we'll do that tomorrow.
4. Henry IV, Part 1 final Socratic Seminar--Thursday.

 Ticket for Thursday: Defend or refute each statement with bullet points or a paragraph:
  • Henry IV is a respectable king.
  • Falstaff is this play's only innocent character
  • Henry IV is essentially an anti-war play.
Also--Write 2-3 strong questions for our discussion. This is part of the ticket.


5. On Thursday  Friday, we'll write an in-class essay about Henry IV, using an A.P. question. Please use the computers for that essay.

HW--Begin looking at the poems linked on Mrs. Leclaire's web page. Do you want to write about the poem or do a creative project about the poem? We'll decide that on Tuesday. On Monday, submit your chosen poem to Mrs. Makovsky.


Thursday, October 24, 2013

October 24, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

1. Enjoy Orson Welles' incredible Battle of Shrewsbury from his film, Chimes at Midnight. (Look for Falstaff in the midst of the chaos...)
2. Go into your acting groups to read and prepare scenes for Monday's presentations. Here are the assignments:
  • Courtiers: 5.1. Suggestion: Cut out repetitive material about the rebel cause and discuss why it is repeated.
  • Rebels: 5.2
  • All Groups: 5.3 and 5.4. The battle!! All groups come together to fight. We need swords and maybe even horses. Assign speaking parts and one director for the battle. It is very important that actors with speaking parts rehearse well. No standing like statues this time. We need fighting and dying.
  • Pub Crawlers: 5.5 (Most of the tavern crew stayed at home, so please lower yourselves and play courtiers today....)
Please use simple props or costumes to distinguish characters; otherwise, things will become too confusing. For example, Henry can wear the crown; Falstaff, a padded hoody. If you hate costumes, at least create name tags for the various characters.

Next Tuesday, I will present information to you about the poetry independent study assignment.

Have a great weekend. No homework!!

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

October 24, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Writing Workshop Day!

Henry's Soliloquy--from Orson Welles' 1965 film, Chimes at Midnight, starring John Guilgud as Henry (Begin viewing a little past 8:50.)

Study the Henry IV, Part 2 speech's rubric and student examples. Discuss.
Go into the large circle, read several essays, and give feedback.

HW: Read Act V for tomorrow. We'll break into acting groups and rehearse the scenes. See yesterday's blog for the acting assignments.

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

October 23, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Please make a name tag. (Mrs. Makovsky is a struggling learner who still doesn't have all of your names in her brain.)

1. Reading ticket? Join the seminar on Act IV!
2. No reading ticket? No desire to participate? See Mrs. Makovsky for an alternate assignment:
  • Post a detailed summary of the discussion on the class blog (under comments, below)
  • Track comments from participants
    • c=comment or response
    • ?=question
    • !=Wow--a breakthrough moment
    • " "=quotation given
  • Log specific references to text--page and line numbers
HW--Read Act V and prepare for Friday's acting groups:
  • Courtiers: 5.1. Suggestion: Cut out repetitive material about the rebel cause and discuss why it is repeated.
  • Rebels: 5.2
  • All Groups: 5.3 and 5.4. The battle!! All groups come together to fight. Assign speaking parts and one director for the battle. It is very important that actors with speaking parts rehearse well. No standing like statues this time. We need fighting and dying.
  • Pub Crawlers: 5.5 (Most of the tavern crew stayed at home, so please lower yourselves and play courtiers today....)
To allay confusion, please use simple props or costumes to distinguish characters. For example, Henry wears the crown; Falstaff, a padded hoody. If you hate costumes, at least create name tags for the various characters.

Monday, October 21, 2013

October 22, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Today we write!

Apostrophe: definition and examples (Hand-out)

Reading tip: Read poetry carefully, paying attention to punctuation marks, particularly end marks. Read from end-mark to end-mark, and figure out the subject of each sentence.

In the following poem, what do you notice about the syntax? Why does the poet do what he does?


Lesson
Forrest Hamer
It was 1963 or 4, summer,
and my father was driving our family
from Ft. Hood to North Carolina in our 56 Buick.
We'd been hearing about Klan attacks, and we knew
Mississippi to be more dangerous than usual.
Dark lay hanging from the trees the way moss did,
and when it moaned light against the windows
that night, my father pulled off the road to sleep.
Noises
that usually woke me from rest afraid of monsters
kept my father awake that night, too,
and I lay in the quiet noticing him listen, learning
that he might not be able always to protect us
from everything and the creatures besides;
perhaps not even from the fury suddenly loud
through my body about his trip from Texas
to settle us home before he would go away
to a place no place in the world
he named Viet Nam. A boy needs a father
with him, I kept thinking, fixed against noise
from the dark.
from Call & Response, 1995
Alice James Books, Farmington, Me.
 
Copyright 1995 by Forrest Hamer.
All rights reserved.
HW--Read and prepare Act IV for tomorrow's (shortened) Socratic Seminar.
 

Sunday, October 20, 2013

October 21, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

1. Hand back Literary Essay #1. If you would like to revise the essay, please set up an appointment with Mrs. Makovsky before you begin rewriting.
2. Finish Act III Henry performances.
3. Discuss Act III, focusing on character development and Shakespeare's developing themes.

Overview of the week:
Tuesday--Timed writing (Henry IV, Part 2 speech)
Wednesday--Act IV is due. Complete the reading ticket and prepare for a Socratic Seminar. At the bottom of your ticket, please compose at least three strong questions to bring forth in discussion.
Thursday--Writing workshop
Friday--Prepare Act V scenes in small groups.

HW--Act IV and reading ticket (plus 3 questions) due Wednesday.

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

October 16:2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Hand in literary essays.
In-progress grades are posted. Questions about A.P. grading procedures?
Continue Henry performances...

Note--On Tuesday, we'll write a timed, in-class essay--an A.P. Lit. question about a passage from Henry IV, Part II. Next Thursday, we'll workshop that essay in class.

HW--Read Act IV of Henry IV, Part I, and prepare for a Socratic Seminar on Wednesday, Oct. 23. Reading ticket: Henry One-Liners (click here for a copy of the document).

Enjoy your long weekend!

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Letter to Your Parents

Linked here is the letter I'm asking you to give to your parents. I'm also asking you to have them sign a slip of paper saying that they received the letter.

Thank you,
Mrs. Makovsky

October 15, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

In your acting groups, study and rehearse your scenes. Showtime: 9:00 (unless that's totally impossible--we'll see...)

Do these things:
  • Read over the entire script together at least once.
  • Paraphrase your lines to ensure that every person in your group understands them.
  • Decide how you will deliver these lines; consider tone, dramatic pauses, volume, body posture, gestures, etc.
  • Develop and implement at least one symbolic choice.
  • Select costumes that fit your character group, literally or symbolically.
  • Practice a few times.

HW--Literary Essay is due tomorrow in class.

Friday, October 11, 2013

October 14, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

1. Today we'll finish the Henry speeches.
2. We'll divide Act III and go into our acting groups to prepare and rehearse.

Because the court scene is brief and contains only two actors, Courtiers will divide. One group will do a rebel scene, one where we see a man and wife who speak two different languages. (Actors might choose to substitute a contemporary love song, which should be easier than Welsh to obtain.)

  • Rebels: 3.1.1-197
  • First Courtiers: 3:1.198-276
  • Second Courtiers: 3.2
  • Pub Crawlers 3.3
As you prepare with your Acting Groups...

  • Read over the entire script together at least once.
  • Paraphrase your lines to ensure that every person in your group understands them.
  • Decide how you will deliver these lines; consider tone, dramatic pauses, volume, body posture, gestures, etc.
  • Develop and implement at least one symbolic choice.
  • Select costumes that fit your character group, literally or symbolically.
  • Practice a few times.

HW--Independent study essay is due Wednesday.

What is a Thesis?

A thesis is a specific, provable, debatable assertion (not a statement of the obvious).


  • Assertion: Something you state as true
  • Specific: Your assertion involves a highly focused statement
  • Provable: Your assertion can be supported with numerous examples from the text, at the same time, not flatly contradicted by other examples in the text, which you might choose to ignore. It needs to be specific enough to prove in a few pages.
  • Debatable: Your assertion provokes viable, intelligent arguments on the opposite side, and it's not a statement of the obvious (addresses the "so what" question). One way to make sure your thesis is debatable is to write it out, then create its "antithesis" that contradicts the original. Does the antithesis sound like a statement of the obvious? If it does, then so is your thesis. The best thesis digs beneath the obvious stereotypes and observations to something deeper.


Thursday, October 10, 2013

October 11, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Today our goal is to finish the Henry presentations.

Monday, we'll break into the acting groups to prepare Henry, Act III scenes.

HW--Independent Study Essay is due next Wednesday.

Enjoy your weekend!

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

October 10, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Continue the Henry IV speech presentations

  • Read the speech (very well) in front of the class
  • Paraphrase it (very accurately and clearly)
  • Do all the steps that were assigned.
  • Audience will ask questions of you after your presentation
  • Mrs. M will grade this as a Tuesday writing. Grade will be based on your presentation--on how thoroughly and competently you meet the requirements.
If you would like to modify the thesis statement, please post a new one on the Oct. 7 class blog. If you reply to my reply, I'll reply again.
Or--if you prefer a face-to-face conversation, come in and see Mrs. Makovsky in the L.A. office. 

Literary Essay #1 is due Wednesday. (I talked to Mr. Miles after school yesterday. He and I are standing firm on next Wednesday's due date!)


October 9, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

1. Mrs. Makovsky would like to talk about blank verse for a few minutes
2. Complete your Henry explications
3. Begin presentations

  • Read the speech (very well) in front of the class
  • Paraphrase it (very accurately and clearly)
  • Do all the steps that were assigned.
  • Audience will ask questions of you after your presentation
  • Mrs. M will grade this as a Tuesday writing. Grade will be based on your presentation--on how thoroughly and competently you meet the requirements.
Enjoy!

HW--Independent study essay is due in one week.

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

October 8, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

1. Wuthering Heights papers will be returned, and Mrs. Mak has a few words about the novel and the papers.
2. Work on your Henry speeches and be prepared to explicate the speech in front of the class tomorrow.

HW--Begin working on the literary essay. Check the blog later today for comments about your thesis.

Sunday, October 6, 2013

October 7, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

1. Grab a computer and post your tentative thesis statements on today's blog (under comments). Also please name your book and author. I will respond to each one of you sometime this week. You may also respond to each other's statements. This is the week to come in and see Mrs. Makovsky if you would like help with the upcoming paper.
2. Today we will complete our reading and viewing of Henry, Act II.
3. Time permitting, we'll begin a close-reading assignment that will be our focus this week.

HW--Independent study essay. Begin working on it now...


Thursday, October 3, 2013

October 4, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Lit?

1. I found Mrs. Boldman's candy! Winners of Multiple Choice Contest get ALL of it!
2. Act II, Henry IV
  • Continue scene 2
  • View and discuss scenes 3, 4, and 5 (or read out loud if you prefer)
Clip 1: Act 2, scene 3 (a bit grainy...and Hotspur has fuzzy hair)
Clip 2: Act 2, scene 4 (2010 production at the Globe Theatre in London!!)
Clip 3: Act 2, scene 5 (2010 production at the Globe Theatre)

Homework: Thesis statement worksheet is due on Monday if you didn't hand it in today.

Have a safe and memorable Homecoming weekend. Make good memories! Take care of each other!

October 3, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: Preparing for the A.P. Exam

Multiple choice practice--individually and in groups.

HW
Thesis worksheet due tomorrow or Monday

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

October 2, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature

1. Wrap up the genealogy chart
2. Read and discuss the Sample Literary Essay from Mr. Kleeman's student
3. If time permits, begin reading Act II of Henry IV

Homework:
Literary Essay Thesis Worksheet due Friday or Monday (your choice)
Continue reading your book for independent study

Tomorrow: Practice A.P. Lit. Multiple Choice exam

Monday, September 30, 2013

October 1, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Lit?

1. Finish performance of Act I, scene 3. Discuss it.
2. Genealogy charts for history lovers
3. Handout--Literary Essay Requirements

HW--Read your independent study book, complete the Thesis Statement Worksheet (for Friday), and engage in as many Homecoming activities as possible. Be Falstaffian (but only to a small degree. Seek joy and laughter--but eschew brew and crime! )

Sunday, September 29, 2013

September 30, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

  1. Act 1 performances! After attendance and greetings, assemble props, put on costumes, and prepare yourselves for your scenes.
  2. As you watch the scenes, prepare questions and comments for the actors regarding their interpretation of the characaters, their ideas about the purpose of the scene, the symbols they included, etc.
Homework: Read Act 2 for Friday and complete a reading ticket.

Thursday, September 26, 2013

September 27, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: Establishing Henry IV's central character dynamics and conflicts through performance

1. Warm-up: Two dramatic read-throughs of Henry IV, 2.2 (yes--we're skipping ahead, but don't worry--we'll come back)

Click HERE for the slides on how to read through and perform 2.2; scroll down to the slide that reads, "Henry IV, Day 2."

Note: Please make at least one SYMBOLIC choice in your performance.  For example, a group last year had Hal carrying around a crumpled up crown in his back pocket; during certain moments, he would take it out and smooth out the wrinkles.

2. Assignments for Act 1 scenes:

  • Courtiers----l.1
  • Rebels------1.2
  • Pub Crawlers-----1.3 to end
Meet in your designated spaces and start rehearsing. Performances will take place on Monday, but you will have 15 minutes to touch base with your groups before the performances begin.

As you prepare with your Acting Groups...

  • Read over the entire script together at least once.
  • Paraphrase your lines to ensure that every person in your group understands them.
  • Decide how you will deliver these lines; consider tone, dramatic pauses, volume, body posture, gestures, etc.
  • Develop and implement at least one symbolic choice.
  • Select costumes that fit your character group, literally or symbolically.
  • Practice a few times.

HW:
1. Bring in any materials you need for your performance on Monday.
2. Independent reading.

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

September 26, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: Workshopping your Tuesday writings

Take 10 minutes to perform the "The 15 Minute Henry"

1. Warm-up: Talking through the prompt and rubric together

2. Reading through a few sample essays; discussing what number range (4 and below, 5, 6-7, or 8-9) you think they received and why.  Try to use lingo from the rubric as you explain your assessment.

3. Getting into a big circle and workshopping the essays of two brave volunteers

As you listen, remember to set your notes in four quadrants:
Content/organization strengths
Content/organization weaknesses
Stylistic strengths
Stylistic weaknesses

HW:
Independent reading.  Enough said.

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

September 25, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: Welcome to the world of Henry IV!
.
As you walk in, pick up a nice, new copy of Henry IV.

1. Making inferences about this play using the illustrated character chart: Click HERE for the slides with all of today's specific directions on the character chart and the 15 Minute Henry

2. Dividing the class into the Courtiers, the Rebels, and the Pub Crawlers; designating King Henry’s court, the rebel camp, and the Boar’s Head Tavern

Think about which section of the classroom makes the most sense for your particular locale, then decorate accordingly.

3. Performing “The 15 Minute Henry”

4. Returning to the illustrated character chart and adding any new knowledge you gained about these characters in class today.

HW:
Independent reading, independent reading, independent reading.  Consider this: How much are you going to read during Homecoming Week?  So, how much do you need to read this week and weekend?

Monday, September 23, 2013

September 24, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: Writing about Wuthering Heights

1. Warm-up: Taking a quick look at a long essay (feel free to read the rest later, if you're interested) on what the feminists have to say about Wuthering Heights:
  • Read and mark up the first paragraph and the last paragraph.
  • Skim until you find a middle paragraph somewhere that interests you; underline the central idea of that paragraph.
  • Share your thoughts and findings with the class.

2. Tuesday Writing #3: Wuthering Heights (40 minutes)

Tip of the day: Try playing around with one or two of the terms on your tone sheet (given out a couple of weeks ago) as you respond to the prompt. Feel free to have this sheet out during the timed writing.

Please note that you cannot use your books for this timed writing since you won't be able to use your books on the actual AP test; you need to get used to paraphrasing your examples specifically yet concisely.

HW:
1. Independent reading (aim to finish by October 7).
2. If you have your own copy of Henry IV, start bringing it to class tomorrow and Friday.

Friday, September 20, 2013

September 23, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: Synthesizing larger ideas about Wuthering Heights

Please take a laptop today.

1. Group warm-up: Read and react to Charlotte's original Preface to Wuthering Heights

2. Individually: Think through Wuthering Heights as you continue with your Big Question Blog post.

Two reminders:

a. Please include specific moments and quotations from the novel in your discussion.

b. Remember that your entry does not need to be a thesis-driven, five paragraph essay (unless that's what you prefer).  Feel free to wander a bit, ask questions, and engage your own, unique voice and style.

3. Final Socratic Seminar: Chapter XXX through the ending of Wuthering Heights. Bring your completed Venn diagrams.

4. If time allows, read and leave comments on each other's posts.  They are all linked to the right side of our class blog.

HW:
1. Finish your blog entry if you did not do so in class.
2. If you have a school copy of WH, please bring it to class tomorrow to turn in.
3. Start reading your independent reading book if you have not done so. 
4. Bring the handout on tone words that I gave out a couple of weeks ago; you will be able to use it on tomorrow's timed writing. 

NOTE: The essay on your independent reading book is due October 16, which means that you'll want to finish reading your book by about October 7, which means that you have about two weeks to read.

Thursday, September 19, 2013

September 20, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: Examining the resolution to Wuthering Heights

1. Warm-up: Establishing dichotomies in Wuthering Heights, creating Venn diagrams, and considering where the characters and settings might fall

2. Final Socratic Seminar: Chapter XXX through the ending of Wuthering Heights

3. Wrapping up with our take-aways...what do these characters think they're seeking?  What are they really seeking?  Do they find it?

HW:
1. Acquire and begin reading your independent reading book (you only have about two or three weeks to read it).

2. Start composing your Big Question Blog post for Wuthering Height; you will also have class time on Monday to do this, so bring your laptop if you have one.

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

September 19, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: Meeting the A.P. Literature multiple choice question...and making friends with it

Please turn in your independent reading proposals!

1. Warm-up: Sharing the multiple choice tricks-of-the trade you've learned from other classes...what strategies worked for you in A.P. Language or in other A.P. classes (if you've taken any)?

Offering you a few multiple choice tricks of my own:

  • Never, ever, look at the answer choices before you read the passage.  You may read the questions (I personally don't, but it works for some), but never read the answer choices.  The wrong answer choices may make you see things in the text that aren't really there.
  • Read and quickly mark up the entire passage before attempting any answers.
  • Find the key word in each question. Many wrong answers are the result of misread questions. 
  • If the test makers throw you a bone by giving you a date, an author, or any italicized information about the poem or passage, read it carefully; it's there to help you.


2. Practicing a multiple choice section (poetry) on your own

3. Grabbing a partner and talking through each question until you come to a consensus on each answer.

4. Discussing the questions and answers as a class

HW:
1. Finish Wuthering Heights and prepare your final reading ticket for our last discussion tomorrow.

2. Acquire your independent reading book ASAP and start reading it!

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

September 18, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: Considering turning points and character (de)evolutions in Wuthering Heights

1. Warm-up: Reading the teenage Bronte's essay, "The Butterfly"; in your composition notebooks, take at least five minutes to reflect on how her ideas in this essay interact with the characters, settings, and metamorphoses in WH

2. Small groups: Discussing Chapters XXII through XXIX of Wuthering Heights

3. Wrapping up with take-aways and questions

4. Please turn in your reading tickets before you go.

HW:
1. Finish your independent reading proposal for tomorrow.

2. Finish Wuthering Heights and compose your final, final reading ticket for Friday.


Monday, September 16, 2013

September 17, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: Building your approach to traditional poetry

1. Warm-up: Considering how traditional conventions of poetry can help you find your way into an older poem

  • What you think you know vs. what you actually know: Sharing your knowledge of poetic terms with Mrs. Boldman (a brief quizzing)
  • With the person next to you, talk through the poetry terms on your handout. Which ones are you familiar with?  Which ones are new? Which ones do you have questions about?
Click HERE for the link to today's poems.


2. Reading through the Wordsworth poem, "To a Butterfly," as a class

a. For the first read-through, mark up the poem in a metacognitive way as we did with the Emily Dickinson poems, pausing to brainstorm connotations of significant diction, explore images, analyze metaphorical language, etc.

b. Perform the second read-through silently, using your new terms to deepen your understanding.  Which terms are most helpful for this particular poem?  What do they help you understand?

c. Discuss "To a Butterfly" in groups of four: Share what you marked up, which terms--especially the new ones--unlocked pieces of the poem for you, and what larger conclusions you drew from the poem.

3. Reading and analyzing the Arnold poem in small groups (follow same steps as above)

4. If time allows, discussing the Arnold poem as a large class

HW: 
1. Follow the Wuthering Heights reading schedule: Through Chapter XXIX + reading ticket for tomorrow's penultimate discussion.

2. Finish your independent reading proposal for Thursday.

Friday, September 13, 2013

September 16, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: Getting (or staying) on top of your A.P. Literature game 

1. Warm-up: Giving you an overview of your first independent reading book and your next literary essay; taking a little time to browse the options

Click HERE for a list of independent reading book possibilities (also linked to the class website).

Click HERE for a link to the independent reading proposal (hard copies given out in class).

Click HERE for a general overview of the first independent reading book and the literary essay that accompanies it.

2. Handing back college essays and explaining revision policies

3. Taking time to read and catch up with Wuthering Heights to make sure everyone is on board for our last two discussions on Wednesday and Friday.

HW:
1. Follow the WH reading schedule: Read through Chapter XXIX + reading ticket for Wednesday.

Would you prefer small groups on Wednesday and big Socratic on Friday?

2. Continue thinking about what you'd like to read for your independent reading book; proposals due this Thursday.

Thursday, September 12, 2013

September 13, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: Analyzing shifting characters and relationships in Wuthering Heights

1. Giving Nick the rest of his feedback (and giving your own essay a little feedback, too)

2. Warm-up: Establishing what motifs you're noticing in WH so far and how we can use them to frame good Socratic questions

3. Socratic Seminar: Discussing Chapters XV-XXI in Wuthering Heights

4. Wrapping up with take-aways and questions

HW:
Follow the WH reading schedule, but here is my gift to you: Instead of having Socratic on Monday, the day will be dedicated to catching/keeping up with the reading and individual reflection.  Enjoy!  You next Socratic is Wednesday, Sep 18, where we will discuss Chapter XXII-XXIX.


Wednesday, September 11, 2013

September 12, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: Workshopping your Tuesday writings

Please turn in your college essays!

1. Warm-up: Discussing the prose passage as a class and your approach to the prompt

2. Exploring two sample essays

3. Workshopping the essays of two courageous volunteers

As you listen, remember to set your notes in four quadrants:

Content/organization strengths
Content/organization weaknesses
Stylistic strengths
Stylistic weaknesses

HW:
Follow the WH reading schedule: Through Chapter XXI + reading ticket for tomorrow's Socratic seminar.

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

September 11, 2013: What's Happening in A.P. Literature?

Focus: Editing the college essay

1. Warm-up: Sharing my 9-11 story with you

2. Establishing your individual needs on the college essay (what concerns do you need addressed today?)

3. Peer editing each other's college essays using the rubric; make sure you leave the prompt and word limit with your draft.

HW:
1. "Final" draft of college essay due tomorrow; please submit a HARD COPY.  At the top, include the following:


An MLA heading
The original prompt
The word limit (if there is one)

2. Follow the WH reading schedule: Through Chapter XXI for Friday + reading ticket. Give yourself some time for this.